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Regina
October 4th, 2009, 06:29 AM
Hi Everyone,

I'll be checking in daily, probably in the evening since I'm something of a night owl LOL but I will be checking in and posting lessons, and articles. So if you have any questions, or just want to comment on something whatever, please do feel free. That's what will make this seminar useful for everyone who visits! And hey, who knows I might even learn something! :-)

Regina

Allwynn
October 4th, 2009, 07:58 PM
Looking forward to doing this. Native American history and culture is soooo fasinating! Thank you for your time!

Oh - I will not be here Friday - Sunday, October 9-11. Am going to go to RomanciCon in Ohio!

Regina
October 4th, 2009, 09:34 PM
No worries, I'll be here the entire month of October, so I'll look forward to chatting with you when you get back. Have fun! :-)

DinehT
October 5th, 2009, 12:14 AM
Hello Regina,

I am looking forward to this discussion. I am a new writer, and I have considered writing with one or more Indian characters. I am part NA, with a great grandmother of the Navajo tribe, even though I was raised in Montana and was seldom around the tribes there. So I have a bit of learning to do, I know. I appreciate your choosing this subject.

Thanks

Regina
October 5th, 2009, 06:07 AM
Hi Dineh,

Perfect! You'll enjoy this class then. Always nice to see people taking an interest in their Indian roots and learning more about it. Like I said, I may even learn something, you just never know! LOL

C.T. Adams
October 18th, 2009, 04:11 PM
Just got my newsletter and discovered you were here. I'm reading to catch up. Thanks for doing this. It's appreciated.

Cie

lin52ster
October 18th, 2009, 06:37 PM
Hi! A friend directed me here. I am writing a novel with a main character from the Navajo Nation. Can you direct me to some native sources for research? I'm especially interested in their cultural beliefs as related to shapeshifting. I see a lot of dubious information on the internet but maybe I'm not looking in the right places. I want to portray their beliefs accurately. By the way, your comments on the sweat lodge disaster was informative. Thanks, Lin

Chrissy Munder
October 18th, 2009, 07:14 PM
Add me to the list of newsletter readers just showing up on you!

Cheryl B
October 18th, 2009, 11:07 PM
Hi Regina,

Thanks for doing the class. You many answer these later in the month, but I thought I would ask now.

In your bio you mention that you are a Oglala Lakota. How many different Lakota groups are there? What part of North America are the Lakota found?

You mentioned in one of the lesson that in Dances with Wolves the men talked like women. So there is male and female description and verb tenses in NA language similar to French?

What would be a good book for me to start with the learn about the Lakota culture?

Cheryl B

Regina
October 18th, 2009, 11:27 PM
Hi CT,

Welcome, glad you could make it! :-) You're absolutely welcome, I think it's something that really needs to be done, and when I was asked to do a seminar this month, I thought it was a timely topic. Feel free to post questions, comments etc. I check the boards daily and respond, and I've been posting things as time allows as well.

Regina

Regina
October 18th, 2009, 11:28 PM
Hi Chrissy,

Welcome! I'm happy you made it! That is what's important. Please feel free to post comments, questions, answers to exercises (there's only one so far). I check back here every day. :-)

Regina

Regina
October 18th, 2009, 11:42 PM
Hi Cheryl,

There are several groups or bands that fall under the Lakota nation. My band happens to be the Oglala, but there are also the Hunkpapa and several others. There are seven related tribes among the Lakota, and we have three major dialects of our language. We're spread out over the Dakotas, Minnesota, Nebraska, and also in Manitoba and southern Saskatchewan in Canada.

With regards to Dances with Wolves and the language, I can really only speak for the Sahaptian and Lakota languages, since these are the two NA languages that I've had exposure to, but yes women speak a particular way, using particular words and sentence structure and it is different from the way the men would say the same thing.

There are couple of books that will give you good insight into Lakota culture, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee and Black Elk Speaks are both excellent.

Hope that answered your questions, feel free to post more! :-)

Regina

Cheryl B
October 18th, 2009, 11:58 PM
Hi Cheryl,

There are couple of books that will give you good insight into Lakota culture, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee and Black Elk Speaks are both excellent.

Hope that answered your questions, feel free to post more! :-)

Regina

Thanks Regina. I'm off the library tomorrow after work.

Regina
October 19th, 2009, 12:07 AM
Hi Lin,

I'm glad you found the information on the sweat lodge tragedy informative. I wanted to make sure that people understood how we felt about what that man was doing, and why we think it went so wrong and people died.

Now, I'm going to be honest, I'm not Navajo, so I don't know too much about that particular tribe. What I would suggest you do is seek out books both fiction and non-fiction that are by Navajo authors, or by people who worked closely with the Navajo to get their information for their book. Tony Hillerman has written books that include Navajo shape shifters and my understanding is he was raised around NA's (not Navajos, Seminole) and got his information directly from other Navajos. You may get some good ideas from his books, and a better understanding of Navajo spirituality and culture. There are also a couple of movies made from his book that have all NA actors that are very good and lend to the man's credibility. My husband likes them, and he's very very particular when it comes that sort of thing.

There is also a list of books from the Smithsonian. I can't attest to their accuracy, but you may find some more information there with regards to their stories, and culture. Here's the link: http://www.si.edu/Encyclopedia_SI/nmai/navajo.htm

I hope that helps and gets you started. :-)

Regina

Regina
October 19th, 2009, 12:08 AM
You're welcome Cheryl. :-)

Regina

Jeanne Vincent
October 19th, 2009, 03:32 PM
Regina, thanks so much for doing this workshop. I'm in the process of creating a NA character to be the hero in my WIP. I want him to be 1/4 White Mountain Apache with strong ties to his maternal NA grandmother. :)

~ Jeanne

Carolan Ivey
October 20th, 2009, 03:13 PM
Thank you for doing this seminar, Regina! I'm looking forward to it. :)

oh_susannah
October 20th, 2009, 03:42 PM
Hi Regina - This workshop caught my eye right away, Thank You for sponsoring this workshop. However, I've been trying to figure out how to get to were the action is (mainly U)! I've joined a long time ago, but I didn't remember this site unless just recently. (Strange must be something in the air). I live in Santa Fe, NM however I grew up in Minnesota and my husband is from South Dakota. (We aren't NA) We've had some knowledge of the Souix Native Ams and while living in Santa Fe we've had contact with the Navaho. My question is are there many differences between the different tribes and their various locations?

lin52ster
October 20th, 2009, 11:02 PM
Hi Regina,

Thanks for the suggestions on Hillerman. I have started with him and am now looking for other sources. Your link will be a big help in getting me started- thanks so much! This is going to be an interesting course.

Lin

Regina
October 21st, 2009, 09:02 PM
Hi Cheryl,

Glad the books are going to be helpful. :-)

Regina

Regina
October 21st, 2009, 09:05 PM
Hi Jeanne,

The White Mountain Apache are a pretty fascinating lot. They have some very interesting cultural traditions that are different from what you see with the plains tribes which people are more familiar with. Good luck with your story!

Regina

Regina
October 21st, 2009, 09:06 PM
Hi Carolan,

You're welcome! :-)

Regina

Regina
October 21st, 2009, 09:13 PM
Hey Susanna,

Yes, there are many differences between the tribes from a cultural and spiritual standpoint. That's why it's so important to research any tribe that you're going to be writing about, and to get your information from the right sources. There are common denominators like the sweat lodge for example, but there are even differences with that. For example, my relatives the Lakota have the pit where the rocks are placed in the center of the lodge. There's a hole dug there and that's where the rocks are placed. However, my husband's relatives the Nez Perce traditionally have a basket for the rocks that sits to the left of the door. Also, the Nez Perce tend to separate the men and women so that the sweat is either all men, or all women. The Lakota do mixed sweats though. Another example is that in the midwest, women do a type of dancing called fancy dancing that normally here in the Pacific Northwest, only men do. So, there are subtle differences, and there are very large differences depending on geography, tribe, and culture. Two of the places that we all pretty much come together are powwows and the sweat lodge. There are variations of course, but these are two traditions that span most of the nations.

Regina

lin52ster
October 21st, 2009, 10:28 PM
Hi Regina,

Is the lore and significance of the White Buffalo widespread among Native American tribes, or only among the larger Nations?

Lin

Regina
October 22nd, 2009, 08:13 PM
Hi Lin,

To my knowledge, the significance is predominantly Lakota because of White Buffalo Calf Pipe Woman who brought the sacred pipe and its related ceremonies to the Lakota. However, most NA's understand the significance and hold white buffaloes to be sacred, no matter what tribe they come from.

Regina

lin52ster
October 22nd, 2009, 08:35 PM
Thanks Regina, glad to be getting this from a source who knows. Much appreciated.

Lin

Regina
October 28th, 2009, 12:28 AM
Hi Lin,

More than welcome! :-)

Regina