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maura
June 6th, 2007, 10:26 AM
I don't want to dig up my yard for a vegetable garden, but I love fresh tomatoes. I usually have two pots with cherry tomatoes and basil in them. I just have to watch my Golden Retriever, she likes them too.

Gabrina
June 6th, 2007, 11:12 AM
I know exactly what you mean! I have six potted tomato plants on my patio which I can't plant because I have doggies. I'm a foster for our local animal control, so right now I have a lot of pups. I have two hounds that love to dig and my tomatos would be gone and torn to shreds!

But garden fresh tomatoes are the very best, aren't they? Man, I wish they were ready right now! You're making me hungry!

Karenne
June 6th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Good point. For those of you out there that are planning to do Patio Tomatoes or any other vegetables in a pot...remember...you have to give the plants more vitamins!

(takes off my gardening gloves):smartass:

Gabrina
June 6th, 2007, 11:56 AM
And more water! the first year I grew tomatoes in pots I lost almost all of them because the dirt was bone dry. I hate when I kill plants and I felt bad since I had no idea what I was doing. Right now we've had a lot of rain (around Chicago) so all of my containers are still drying out.

Should I be worried about that? Will the roots rot or something?

I really have no idea what I'm doing! I'm a dog foster...I can tell you how to keep your dogs healthy but not how to keep your plants alive! :lol:

luv2read
June 11th, 2007, 12:54 PM
I have a small garden in which we put a fence around that our dogs weren't able to jump over or dig their way into it. Maybe you could try to put a small fence around it.

Linda L Lattimer
June 11th, 2007, 01:49 PM
I got some of the little potted tomato seeds and put them in a huge container on my porch and take care of them everyday. Since it is hard for me to bend, I thought I would try the huge pot, but I wonder will they still make anything, since they really need to be under the ground, probably, am I right on this one?

Janice Seagraves
April 23rd, 2010, 04:40 AM
I got some of the little potted tomato seeds and put them in a huge container on my porch and take care of them everyday. Since it is hard for me to bend, I thought I would try the huge pot, but I wonder will they still make anything, since they really need to be under the ground, probably, am I right on this one?

It depends. Are you growing patio tomatoes (determinate) or regular indeterminate.

If you have indeterminate your tomatoes will get leggy (long), but even in a pot they will put on fruit if the pot is big enough. They need a very large container opposed to the patio verities, which you can raise in a 20 inch pot.

Which ever one you grow you will have to stake them. Find a good stake either a redwood or metal covered in plastic usually found at your local home improvement store. Then put a tomato cage around it. Most patio tomatoes verities only need the stake.

Also water often, especially if your plants are outside. The sun can really dry out the peat-moss that most potting soil is made of and tomato plants are heavy drinker. I use posting soil that has vitamins already in the mix. You can also buy a fish emulsion to fertilize with. Its a cheep fertilizer that smells like fish, but the fishy smell only last a day or two.

Growing a container garden is a wonderful way to garden if you have back or leg problems, or just have limited room in your yard.

Have fun and good luck.

Janice~

Janice Seagraves
April 23rd, 2010, 04:45 AM
And more water! the first year I grew tomatoes in pots I lost almost all of them because the dirt was bone dry. I hate when I kill plants and I felt bad since I had no idea what I was doing. Right now we've had a lot of rain (around Chicago) so all of my containers are still drying out.

Should I be worried about that? Will the roots rot or something?

I really have no idea what I'm doing! I'm a dog foster...I can tell you how to keep your dogs healthy but not how to keep your plants alive! :lol:

You can tell if your tomato plants has had too much water because they'll typically behave in one of two ways; either by wilting (always a bad sign) or the leaves turning yellow. If the leaves still a nice dark green with no wilt they should be fine.

Janice~

Amber Green
April 24th, 2010, 11:06 AM
I planted a coyote tomato in one of these the other day for a friend. I told her the plant would probably ramble all over the place, so she's planning to guide it to a nearby arbor/arch.

I used the "potting soil" she had, but it was poor stuff. Heavy, for one thing. If I plant one of these myself, it will have plenty of vermiculite and water crystals in it. But instead of buying one, I'm much more likely to melt a hole in the bottom of a five-gallon bucket and make my own. Which of course means tell my husband I want such a hole melted.

In my garden, the things I normally have good luck with (summer squash, cosmos, sunflowers, tithonia, etc) are doing very poorly and the things I normally can't do well (tomato FROM SEED!, perennials from seed, and tobacco) are doing very well. It's odd.

Also, meet the new member of the pack: Baron http://www.coffeetimeromance.com/board/attachment.php?attachmentid=375&stc=1&d=1272121501

Janice Seagraves
April 25th, 2010, 01:53 AM
I planted a coyote tomato in one of these the other day for a friend. I told her the plant would probably ramble all over the place, so she's planning to guide it to a nearby arbor/arch.

I used the "potting soil" she had, but it was poor stuff. Heavy, for one thing. If I plant one of these myself, it will have plenty of vermiculite and water crystals in it. But instead of buying one, I'm much more likely to melt a hole in the bottom of a five-gallon bucket and make my own. Which of course means tell my husband I want such a hole melted.

In my garden, the things I normally have good luck with (summer squash, cosmos, sunflowers, tithonia, etc) are doing very poorly and the things I normally can't do well (tomato FROM SEED!, perennials from seed, and tobacco) are doing very well. It's odd.

Also, meet the new member of the pack: Baron http://www.coffeetimeromance.com/board/attachment.php?attachmentid=375&stc=1&d=1272121501

Sometimes that happens. Did you amend the soil and rotate the areas where you planted from the year before?

If you plant a member of the same family group ie; nightshade family; tomatoes, potatoes, tobacco, and petunia in the same areas they will use the same nutrition, depleting the soil.

Its very important to rotate your crops, just like farmers do but on a much small scale of course.

BTW, I like your idea of tomato container gardening. I think that would work quite well.

Good luck with all your garden efforts.
Janice~

Amber Green
April 25th, 2010, 01:48 PM
I didn't know petunias were in the solanaceae, but I don't plant them anyway. My annual/vegetable planting area is small enough that some spots will inevitably go from tomato to pepper or from pepper to potato every year, but I try to fork in enough compost and peat to minimize the risk of disease or specific nutrient depletion.

Kim Smith
April 25th, 2010, 04:48 PM
I am thinking of getting one or so of those hanging tomato planters... anyone use one of those?

Janice Seagraves
April 26th, 2010, 02:26 AM
I didn't know petunias were in the solanaceae, but I don't plant them anyway. My annual/vegetable planting area is small enough that some spots will inevitably go from tomato to pepper or from pepper to potato every year, but I try to fork in enough compost and peat to minimize the risk of disease or specific nutrient depletion.

Compost is wonderful for garden plants, and tomatoes also love peat moss, too.

Janice~

LelaniBlack
April 26th, 2010, 10:26 AM
For those who love patio tomatoes, take an empty wine bottle, fill it with water and a little bit of soluble plant food then shove the bottle spout down deep into the tomato pot, not so close to the root, though. This helps hydrate your plant as well as feed it, since tomatoes are heavy feeders. I get the most productive tomato plants this way. Of course you'll still water, but if you're in a drier climate, or like me, forget to water, this helps keep the soil moist, and the plant is not too stressed.