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Sascha_Illyvich
August 3rd, 2007, 02:34 PM
Good afternooon class,

As I may have mentioned yesterday in an earlier lesson, in romance writing we tend to be attracted to the jaded males. Why? I think it's inherit in nature to want to comfort as a woman and the yummy jaded male beckons us to fix him. To love him in many ways.

While that's not always the case, I'm using him as our primary focus for this lesson because he's IMO the perfect study of what every man thinks or wants to be.

Again this is just my opinion.

Let’s go over the Archetypes first, then discuss how our Jaded Male Hero fits in.

There are Eight male archetypes. For the purposes of this course I’m going to list them but focus on only a select few since we’re concentrating on the darker side of men right now.

Male Archetypes Defined:

The Chief – The Ultimate Alpha. Think Christine Feehan’s Dark series. All her men are power, lust and bossy in one body but Mikhail Dubrinsky is the leader of the Carpathians. He is Alpha (yum!)

The Bad Boy – James Dean played this role. This guy does what he wants and aint nobody gonna tell him his business!

The Best Friend –Described as the Beta Hero, he’s a likable, dependable character. I’ve seen him in plenty of the Harlequin BLAZE lines. Christian from my Silk’s Vault Release “A Christmas Favor” was a best friend.

The Charmer – Oh this guy’s good! Many of the classic movies featuring Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire or Cary Grant featured this guy. Non committal, fun loving, a smooth talker, he’d have your number and a drink in hand. He’d be great company but he’s not the committing type.

The Lost Soul – We all knew someone growing up who was a great person, but seemed distant. A little out there in terms of sharing themselves with the world. That’s this guy. He’s secretive, and secretly probably harboring something inside such as a perceived tremendous fault that holds him back from his full potential as a lover or companion. Many of my heroes are Lost Souls because I know it very, very well. Think Zarek from Sherrilyn Kenyon’s Dark Hunter series.

The Professor – The Professor likes data, cold hard facts. Think Christine Feehan’s Drake Sisters novel, Dangerous Tides. The hero was a researcher who simply couldn’t believe in the magick of each Drake Sister.

The Swashbuckler – Up for discussion, but Vin Diesel from Riddick and A Man Apart. Action is this guy’s name. He has the coolness of the bad boy, and the leadership skills of the Chief! Also, Gene Kelly in The Pirate was a great Swashbuckler! Literally!

The Warrior – The man who fights for what’s right. Hercules or Bruce Willis in the Die Hard movies are both great Warriors.

There you have the eight male archetypes. The next question is: where does my Jaded Male fit in?

Sascha_Illyvich
August 3rd, 2007, 02:48 PM
He can be any one of the archetypes or a combination. The key question is what is his primary motive and goal in the story? Letís cover a few definitions here:

Goal: What the hero thinks he wants
Motive: What the hero really needs

Iíll be using examples from various novels, including my own work to illustrate my point.

Since my signature features information on a story of mine Iíll use Raining Kisses Hero Nicholaus as my example. Nicholaus left the Opeth pack because he believed he wanted solitude and to hide from his violent self, a murderous wolf. It took someone from the outside to come in and show him what he really needed, which was love, support and acceptance.
Many men are typical in this fashion and often think in what I call a linear pattern.

For example, ďIf Iíve offended someone (a woman) then the best course of action is to leave her alone. Because thatís what I (think I) want. The response is a learned behavior. Helped along by other males, fathers, grandfathers, etc. Other parents and of course the Mother. The Jaded Male behaves in a manner that is reinforced constantly during his childhood and teenage years.

If he really offended her, what does she truly want? Probably a chance to tell him how she felt about his action and to either make it right or perhaps just tell him off.

Menís actions are based on their gut (read heart and mind), with more or less emphasis depending on the archetype and the reinforcement.

While many men in real life are stolid and require a great deal of time to change, this is fiction! Youíve got to begin the change as early as possible for your character, even if that means a good kick in the seat. Perhaps your heroine is just as strong willed as he is. Either way she must balance him somehow. Think about how things affect her. What does she do when something bad happens to her? How does she behave?

For a well balanced and believable pair, heís got to react to the same scenarios in a manner that compliments hers. Even in weakness there are strengths.

Now the Hero doesnít HAVE to be jaded. But can anyone imagine the sweet boy from high school we all ignored being any sort of rebel? Is he interesting enough to hold himself up in difficult situations? Possibly. But will he capture your readers attention?

Iíve got a little homework for you authors. Take two of your present male characters from any story and list their archetype, their goal and their motive. Iíll play too.

Jůzsi from His Reign is a Chief.
His Goal: He believes he wants a quiet life
His Motive: He really needs security and someone else to have faith in him. Turns out itís two someones!

Marco from my upcoming release ďLost: A short story in the Opeth Pack sagaĒ is the Lost Soul
His Goal: Marco believed he wanted someone to take care of him and to be treated like a man in his pack.
His Motive: Direction.

Now itís your turn!

rgraham666
August 3rd, 2007, 04:10 PM
You missed the greatest Swashbuckler of all time, Peter Blood as played by Errol Flynn. ;)

My best hero to date is my vampire Georges Belleveau. Yeah, I do go on about him, don't I?

When writing him I don't really think in terms of goals and motives, at least not logically. Instead I get inside his skin and look at what's happening through his eyes and his perceptions.

However, having thought about it he did have goals and a motive.

His goal was to enjoy his existence, keep the monster that lived in him in control and not do any damage to other people.

His motive was to have another to love and share his existence.

Sascha_Illyvich
August 3rd, 2007, 04:20 PM
You missed the greatest Swashbuckler of all time, Peter Blood as played by Errol Flynn. ;)

My best hero to date is my vampire Georges Belleveau. Yeah, I do go on about him, don't I?

When writing him I don't really think in terms of goals and motives, at least not logically. Instead I get inside his skin and look at what's happening through his eyes and his perceptions.

However, having thought about it he did have goals and a motive.

His goal was to enjoy his existence, keep the monster that lived in him in control and not do any damage to other people.

His motive was to have another to love and share his existence.

Haha, you're right. Erol Flynn was great, wasn't he?

It's good to look inside our hero's skin, but that's actually the next lesson lol! When we think about goals and motives, we start to narrow down why our heroes are there in the story. Obviously the'yve got a story to tell and want to get it out, but left to them, it'd be linear as I mentioned earlier.

Nicole Gestalt
August 3rd, 2007, 04:54 PM
Ok well for this I'll use my male character from Summer of Fire and my male character from the most recent WIP.

Mark is a firefighter, and became one after his wife died in a fire a number of years ago. After having thought about it a lot I've decided to say:

Goal: Work, something to push himself forwards
Motive: To Mark's suprise it turns out he needs Helen, he has to have someone to look after and who is strong enough to look after him.

My second male is currently nameless but I'll call him Jack for now. Jack is a fey like creature who travels to different worlds.

Goal: To bring the expected ice and snow and coldness to the different worlds he visits.
Motive: He needs to be loved, he has locked himself away in an ice palace but when he rescues a young woman he finds himself being warmed by her.

I hope all thats ok!

D.N. Lyons
August 3rd, 2007, 08:35 PM
Neptune is a charmer.:tt1:
His goal is to overpower all.
What he needs is a lover.

Mars is a bad boy.:tt1:
His goal is to become the Lord of War.
What he needs is someone to nurture him.

I lurrrrrrve my characters. <33333333

dahlia robertson
August 4th, 2007, 10:37 AM
the hero in my current wip

Bane is a semi reformed bad boy, he was the spymaster of my villian. He has done and seen just about everything to achieve his goal.

GOAL- To hold on to the throne of Draken and secure the sorceress Sorcha as his mate.

Motivation- Caliming his birthright, stolen from him when his mother was murdered at the moment of his birth.

Sascha_Illyvich
August 6th, 2007, 02:00 PM
Good work you guys :) So far we haven't touched on too many differences between males and female characters but the next lesson on Emotion is where we'll start to differentiate what makes a man a man internally.

Sascha