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litekepr
March 3rd, 2008, 02:45 PM
I'm going to share some excerpts from the first chapter of Book Promo 101. I think that it is important to people to understand promotion and marketing before they can learn to promote effectively. Each chapter in the book has review questions, and I'll include some at the end of this post. It will be interesting to see what you all think :)

Develop a Marketing Mind

Each author has a responsibility to promote their books. Some large publishing companies offer some promotional assistance. Bestselling and well known authors get plenty of
promotion, but those of us who are lesser known, need to do the majority of our promotion—ourselves. I could hide that fact from you, but it won’t help in the long run. So, it’s better to accept that it’s a fact in each author’s life. A word to any publishers who read this book—we appreciate any promotional assistance our publishers can offer, but we
understand the majority of this work is our responsibility.

Before you begin to promote your book, it’s good to develop a marketing mind. Anyone can learn to promote and I’ll help you develop the mind set and identify the traits that are needed to be an effective promoter. Let’s start with the way to develop a marketing mindset.

Adjust Your Mindset

There are many interesting ways to promote your book, both online and off. We’ll discuss a lot of different ideas in this book. There are many free or inexpensive techniques you can
use and these are my favorite things. Not all ideas are free and some will cost you money, but many aren’t expensive. I’ll be honest with you that these promotional ideas require your time and effort.

You have the alternative of hiring someone to do these things for you and we’ll talk about that in chapter 3. Most of the ideas we’ll discuss aren’t complicated.

I’ve included the links to many web sites to make your search easier. Most of these ideas can be implemented by anyone. My hope is that you’ll refer back to this book and continue to learn from it for years to come.

Many authors I talk with think marketing and promotion are beyond their abilities. I managed a business for a man about ten years ago and he never wanted to discuss advertising for the business. His usual response was that advertising “was that dirty ‘A’ word”. Are you the type of person who believes that promotion is a dirty word or that it’s beyond your ability?

Advertising and promotion are not bad words. In fact they are essential for a successful business and for authors who want to get their books into the hands of readers. Promotion
can take many shapes and the type of promotion you choose depends on whether you promote online or off-line. These are some of the considerations that will be important in
your promotional decisions and activities.

• The marketing avenues depend on the type of books you’re
promoting.
• What sort of promotional work would you be able to do?
• Is online promotion better since you don’t have to interact face to face?



Three Facets of Marketing

There are three facets to marketing. It helps when you understand the differences. This is an initial step in developing your promotional mindset. The facets include:

1—Advertising
2—Promotion
3—Publicity

You may be asking—what do those things mean? The following overview gives you an idea of what’s included in these marketing possibilities.


Qualities of a Great Marketing Person

Some key qualities of a great promotional person are:

• Determination
• Persistence
• An open mind
• Curiosity


Determined or Persistent— Which Are You?

First, let’s talk about determination and persistence. These are two qualities that some people feel are positive, but other people consider them to be negative. The difference
can depend on how these qualities are exhibited.

Determination and persistence are positive traits, but you can drive people crazy if you’re persistent or determined in an irritating way. Be honest with yourself—are you persistent or obnoxious? There is a difference between those two traits.

A persistent person sees a project through to the end or until you reach the goal. How do you handle people who aren’t interested in your product or service? Do you continue to bother them and pester them when it’s clear they aren’t
interested? The way you handle a difficult or uninterested person reveals a lot about your promotional and sales abilities. A person may develop an interest in you or your book over time.

However, if you continue to contact them after they say they aren’t interested, they don’t get a chance to develop that interest.

There are very few people that respond in a positive way when they are pestered and badgered. They may buy your book in order to get you to leave them alone. But, will they make an effort to purchase your next book or recommend it to others? Will they return the book and change their contact information? It’s been known to happen. People who use high pressure sales techniques are more apt to have a short term success instead of profitable long term success.

A store owner that I worked for had the philosophy that he should take the customer for everything he could while they were in the store. I tried to explain that would never give
him lasting success, but he didn’t agree. About a year after I stopped working for him, he had to sell the business. People respond better to a good value and they want you to show them what your book has to offer to them.


Keep Your Mind Open About Promotional Opportunities

Keeping an open mind will help you search for ways to improve your approach, your books, your web site and more. Keep your eyes and mind open for ways to improve.

Everyone can find ways to improve. Your readers and web site visitors and blog visitors can offer useful input. When you get a chance, ask them what they like and what they don’t like about your work.



Curiosity Can Be A Wonderful Promotional Quality

Are you a curious person? Do you like to learn more about the things and people around you? Find a way to use that inborn curiosity to offer better books for your readers. Whether you’re offering one book or twenty books, you can
always find ways to promote them better.

Curiosity gives you a chance to stretch your creative abilities. This is a great opportunity to “think outside the box”. Open your mind and let your imagination run free. Focus those ideas to your product or service and your web site. This doesn’t mean everything you do or try will be perfect. You still need to make adjustments, but it gets better with each change and adjustment.

Exercises to help you learn more:

1. Is it necessary to hire a professional to promote your book?
2. Can authors learn to promote themselves and their books?
3. What are the three facets of marketing?
4. Name the four qualities of a great marketing person.
5. Why should you think ‘outside the box’ when dealing with promotions?
6. Give an example of a way to think ‘inside the box’.
7. Give an example of thinking ‘outside the box’.
8. Should you to listen to ideas and suggestions from others? Why?
9. Write a 100-200 word description of your book.
10. Put together a list of target audiences for your book. Explain why you chose these types of people.


Book Promo 101 - http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1594314691 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1594314691)

Carol Beth
March 5th, 2008, 12:06 PM
This is great information, Nikki. Although I'm not at this point in my career (as in, I'm not published - yet), I feel it's never too early to learn. That way, when it does happen, you'll be prepared.

Thanks for sharing!

litekepr
March 5th, 2008, 12:46 PM
This is great information, Nikki. Although I'm not at this point in my career (as in, I'm not published - yet), I feel it's never too early to learn. That way, when it does happen, you'll be prepared.

Thanks for sharing!


Glad you enjoyed it :) One of the next chapters in the book is about when you can start promoting. It started out as a short chapter, but I put together some great information about things that author can do early on in the process and things they should definitely consider before looking for a publisher and before signing a contract.

Remember, once you sign that contract - you're stuck with them for a specific period of time. I've said it before - not having a contract is bad, but having a contract with the wrong publisher can be much worse.

Nikki Leigh