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View Full Version : What exactly is the classification of Western Romance?



ladybecklyn
March 4th, 2007, 06:00 PM
I am wondering because I have read some romance novels that could be classified as historical but are also western in nature. What is the actual classification, is there a set standard?

Rebecca_Goings
April 1st, 2007, 03:27 PM
Western romances are usually American historicals, set after the Civil War. From 1866 to about 1900 is the time frame. The stories revolve around either a cowboy or an Indian, during the days of the great push to "Go West!"

So think "Wild West" here. Wyatt Earp. Jesse James. Billy the Kid. These books take place between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Ocean. Books set on the Eastern seaboard isn't usually considered a "Western", because the term technically means "west" of the Mississippi.

So all the western states are pretty much fair game, from Kansas to Texas, to Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, you get the idea.

Even a book set in San Francisco during the Gold Rush could be considered a western, because of the "lawlessness" that went on. Westerns usually have the stigma of being "wild" and "untamed", just as the country they are settling.

A book on the Oregon Trail, for example, would also be considered a western. Usually books about wide open skies, small, booming towns, sand and sage, and horsemen. You have to stear clear of any big cities in a western. You can start or end in one, but the majority of the story must be in the wilderness. A small town or a ranch is considered "the wilderness", because it's not in a big city. :P

Clear as mud?

~~Becka
http://www.RebeccaGoings.com

ladybecklyn
April 5th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Excellent, thanks for the clarification!

LauraReagan
June 25th, 2007, 08:17 PM
Whew! I love it!

CathieCaffey
June 26th, 2007, 01:53 AM
Hi Laura and Rebecca!

Westerns are really just a great comfort read for me! I just could so 'feel' the outside while reading these! Plus with me, I lub cowboyus :) :gun_bandana:
Sorry I couldn't find a cowboy smiley so this is as close as I came, :lol:

Diane Davis White
March 19th, 2008, 10:43 AM
The very essence of the Old West brings 'romance' to mind. Cowboys or Caballeros, Native American Warriors, Sheriffs or Ranchers....they all have that 'rough, tough, danged good-looking-with-a-sweet-side' potential. All it takes is imagination and a little knowledge about...well, the west. :knight:
A good western has romance, even if it's not between the hero and heroine, but in the ROMANCE genre, they have to be the main focus of the story...because...well, that's what the reader wants. xmasrofl

Historical Westerns can be strictly that, or Historical Westerns w/Romantic elements, or Historical ROMANTIC Western.... It doesn't matter what you call it, the bottom line is...well, is it a good read?
Thanks,
Diane

JacquieRogers
September 22nd, 2008, 03:59 AM
Westerns are really just a great comfort read for me! I just could so 'feel' the outside while reading these! Plus with me, I lub cowboyus :) :gun_bandana:
Sorry I couldn't find a cowboy smiley so this is as close as I came, :lol:

Me, too, Cathie. I think it's the feeling of the wind and the open sky. Take a deep breath and the sagebrush will take you 120 years back. Then throw in a hunky hero and a sexy heroine, and wow, I'll plunk my money down for that any day!

Gwyn Lacy
April 29th, 2010, 06:16 PM
I love westerns! I was a very young girl when I read all my Louis L'amour and Zane Grey books. Not exactly romance, but the consumate story tellers. This is the best description of a western that I have read. Thanks!:popcorn:
Western romances are usually American historicals, set after the Civil War. From 1866 to about 1900 is the time frame. The stories revolve around either a cowboy or an Indian, during the days of the great push to "Go West!"

So think "Wild West" here. Wyatt Earp. Jesse James. Billy the Kid. These books take place between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Ocean. Books set on the Eastern seaboard isn't usually considered a "Western", because the term technically means "west" of the Mississippi.

So all the western states are pretty much fair game, from Kansas to Texas, to Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, you get the idea.

Even a book set in San Francisco during the Gold Rush could be considered a western, because of the "lawlessness" that went on. Westerns usually have the stigma of being "wild" and "untamed", just as the country they are settling.

A book on the Oregon Trail, for example, would also be considered a western. Usually books about wide open skies, small, booming towns, sand and sage, and horsemen. You have to stear clear of any big cities in a western. You can start or end in one, but the majority of the story must be in the wilderness. A small town or a ranch is considered "the wilderness", because it's not in a big city. :P

Clear as mud?

~~Becka
http://www.RebeccaGoings.com