Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default How To Write a Romance Novel-Dialogue

    Hope everyone had a good weekend. This week I’mgoing to focus on two more important aspects of writing, dialogue and point ofview.>>
    Writing dialogue is one of my favorite things aboutcreating a story. Some writers have an ear for it while others struggle. Greatdialogue is something that makes a reader sit up and take notice. However, donepoorly, it can stick out like a sore thumb and have a reader cringe, so there’sa lot resting on learning the skill. >>
    Sowhat is great dialogue?>>
    I think it has the following characteristics->>
    >>
    It’sNatural Sounding>>
    Good dialogue never sounds too formal, meaning thatit has contradictions and slang thrown in now and then.>>
    >>
    ItDoesn’t Tell the Whole Story In One or Two Character’s Lines>>
    Some writers yes, even published ones, use dialogueas a vehicle to tell the reader everything they want them to know. Take itslow, don’t put words into your character’s mouths all at once…feed it to themslowly.>>
    >>
    Theperson doing the speaking doesn’t tell the other characters information theyalready know just for the sole purpose of telling the reader>>
    This is one of my pet peeves, not just in books buton TV too. In fact, I see TV shows doing it all the time now. I know thatmedium only has maybe 45 minutes to get the story across during each episode,but I still think it’s lazy writing. An example, two forensic experts talking,and one saying, I’m putting this under the microscope to look for latentfingerprints. We might not know that but another forensics expert would. In abook this would come across as not true to life and the writer would losecredibility with the reader.>>
    >>
    It’sDistinctive to the Character>>
    Dialogue done right allows the reader to know justwho’s doing the talking. It’s specific to each of your characters. It might bethe way the character phrases something or even pauses between words orthoughts. >>
    >>
    Itreveals something about the character and other characters or even the plot>>
    It’s always doing something. It’s never static or adead weight. We learn something we didn’t know a page before or even in theprevious sentence, and it also progresses the plot>>
    >>
    Waysyou can improve your dialogue writing->>
    >>
    Practice-I’vefound that rather than avoid things you’re not good at, practice can makeperfect. When you sit down to write spend the first ten minutes just writingdialogue.>>
    Eavesdrop-It’sa good vice to have when it comes time for writing dialogue. Sometimes it’s notso much what people say but how they say it. >>
    ReadDialogue-and the best way to do that is to pick up ascreenplay. A good ear for dialogue is a must for a screenwriter.>>
    ReadAloud-one thing I do when I’m editing any of my work be infiction or non-fiction is to read it aloud. You’ll hear what’s working andwhat’s not, and this is especially true for dialogue.>>
    >>
    If dialogue is your Achilles heel; or if you feelthere’s a section of dialogue that’s not working in your story, how abouttrying to incorporate any or all of the characteristics I’ve mentioned and seehow it changes things.>>
    >>
    Ifyou have any questions about dialogue or anything else I’ve covered so far, askaway. Later this week I’ll be talking about Point of View so have your questionsready for that topic too.>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
  2. SuzanneLilly's Avatar
    Reading: I am Malala
    TBR: >100
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    6

    Awards Showcase

    SuzanneLilly is offline
    #2

    revision

    Thanks for offering this class, SusieP. I just joined and I'm catching up on the posts. I'm interested in learning more about plot twists.

    Suzanne

    Quote Originally Posted by SusieP View Post
    Hope everyone had a good weekend. This week I’mgoing to focus on two more important aspects of writing, dialogue and point ofview.>
    Suzanne Lilly
    Romance with a splash of supernatural suspense.
    Blog: TeacherWriter
    Twitter: @suzannelilly
    Facebook: SuzanneLillyAuthor

  3. Mairhi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    8

    Awards Showcase

    Mairhi is offline
    #3

    Default

    Hi Suzanne,
    I'm so happy I found this workshop, just when I needed it.
    I've been writing for a little over a year and belong to a write/critique group.
    In some of my writing, I have a "back and forth banter" between characters. I think it helps enhance
    the characters personalities. But, I have been told that this is head-hopping.
    Do you have any advice on this subject?
    Thank you,
    Mairhi
  4. SuzanneLilly's Avatar
    Reading: I am Malala
    TBR: >100
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    6

    Awards Showcase

    SuzanneLilly is offline
    #4

    Default Mairhi's question

    Hi Mairhi!

    We should probably see what SusieP has to say about this. But basically head hopping is not staying in one POV during a scene.
    Suzanne Lilly
    Romance with a splash of supernatural suspense.
    Blog: TeacherWriter
    Twitter: @suzannelilly
    Facebook: SuzanneLillyAuthor

  5. #5

    Default Head Hopping and Dialogue Banter

    Hi Mairhi, no banter between two characters in dialogue is not head-hopping( I'll be talking more about that topic later this week). However, if you've included narration along with the dialogue then your critique group might be referring to some slips into head-hopping in that. For example, if let's say Jane and John are talking and we're in Jane's POV, in the narration part if you say John was really angry that would be a head-hop because you've stated a fact and not an assumption by Jane, our POV character. However, it would be okay to say Jane assumed or thought John seemed angry by the way he'd raised his voice when he spoke. Hope this helps answer the question, all the best, Susan
  6. Darcy Flynn's Avatar
    Reading: The Hunger Games
    TBR: 7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Franklin TN and London, England
    Posts
    8

    Awards Showcase

    Darcy Flynn is offline
    #6

    Default

    Susan, Just wanted to follow up and let you know that after I made my playlist to write to, I've now written over 3000 words on my manuscript. And as you suggested, I've picked a specific time to write, as well. It has really made a difference in my productivity and plot inspiration!
    Thanks again for this class!
  7. DaniCollins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2

    Awards Showcase

    DaniCollins is offline
    #7

    Default Productivity and Play List

    Hi Darcy and Suzanne,

    First Way To Go Darcy! 3000 words. That's awesome.

    And I totally agree with routine being helpful for productivity, but I'm always amazed with anyone who can listen to anything when they write. I like silence, so tell me how music helps rather than hinders? What happens if you try silence?

    Dani
    Dani Collins
    Pursuing Happily Ever After One Page At A Time
    www.danicollins.com
  8. SuzanneLilly's Avatar
    Reading: I am Malala
    TBR: >100
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    6

    Awards Showcase

    SuzanneLilly is offline
    #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DaniCollins View Post
    I'm always amazed with anyone who can listen to anything when they write. I like silence, so tell me how music helps rather than hinders? What happens if you try silence?

    Dani
    I'm so with you on this, Dani. I can't write while listening to a playlist. I hear songs that inspire my writing, but while I'm actually pounding out the words, I need it quiet to sink into the ms. One exception is if I'm writing at the local coffeeshop. I don't seem to have any problem tuning out the background noise there.

    Suzanne
    Suzanne Lilly
    Romance with a splash of supernatural suspense.
    Blog: TeacherWriter
    Twitter: @suzannelilly
    Facebook: SuzanneLillyAuthor

  9. DaniCollins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2

    Awards Showcase

    DaniCollins is offline
    #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneLilly View Post
    I'm so with you on this, Dani. I can't write while listening to a playlist. I hear songs that inspire my writing, but while I'm actually pounding out the words, I need it quiet to sink into the ms. One exception is if I'm writing at the local coffeeshop. I don't seem to have any problem tuning out the background noise there.

    Suzanne
    LOL, I think I'm the same. I've written next to swimming pools and on the beach (used my Alphasmart NEO, not the laptop!) and yeah, in those cases I have no problem ignoring other noise. But woe betide the child who plays his video game too loud when I'm trying to write. That's funny. I didn't realize I was the same.

    Still, I'm amazed when authors say, "Here's my playlist for this book I wrote." It's really cool, but so not me.
    Dani Collins
    Pursuing Happily Ever After One Page At A Time
    www.danicollins.com
  10. Darcy Flynn's Avatar
    Reading: The Hunger Games
    TBR: 7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Franklin TN and London, England
    Posts
    8

    Awards Showcase

    Darcy Flynn is offline
    #10

    Default Writing to music

    Hi Dani,

    Usually, I write to silence, as well. But, I was having trouble with my latest WIP. I had trouble seeing where it was going, with the plot. SusieP suggested I put together a play list and write to it every day. That when I hear that music I know it's time to write. Kind of like Pavlov and his dogs! LOL And she told me to pick a time and write during that time. Developing a routine, if you will. Well, that advice worked for me. I'm still writing every day, to that music and starting at the same time.

    The thing about the music, is I chose instrumental, no words. That's too distracting. It did take me a minute to get used to hearing it but the fact that the 30 minutes of music plays over and over, makes it disappear in a way. It becomes the theme music for my story. Try it. And see if it works for you.

    But I know what you're saying about needing quiet. I still can't write if the tv's on or if my husband is trying to talk to me.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •